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The area of damage can determine the severity of brain injuries

Head trauma can affect people in Ontario and elsewhere in different ways. Brain injuries are unique, just like no two people are alike. The area of the brain where the damage occurred will determine which of the brain functions are affected. The left and right sides of the brain are called hemispheres. A nerve fibre network connects the two hemispheres, and the hemispheres have different lobes, each responsible for a specific function.

The brain consists of billions of neurons or cells, along with blood vessels, said to be 100,000 miles long. When brain damage occurs, neurons in the area of impact die, and they do not grow again. Moreover, dead neurons can kill off surrounding ones in a cascading fashion. This explains why some symptoms of brain damage become apparent months after the trauma occurred. Although neurons cannot be replaced, the brain can build neural pathways to overcome some of the damage.

Acquired brain injuries are those that occur after a person's birth and are not a genetic condition that is present at birth. When an infection, brain tumour or stroke causes brain injuries, it is an acquired brain injury. However, brain damage caused by head trauma, such as a fall, car accident, sports injury or a gunshot wound, is called a traumatic brain injury. Not all TBIs cause permanent damage, and therapy could bring some level of recovery.

When traumatic brain injuries are caused by the negligence or recklessness of another person, the victim might have grounds to pursue financial relief. Mounting medical and therapy bills, and lost income could become overwhelming. A personal injury lawyer in Ontario with specific experience in dealing with brain injuries can provide support and guidance throughout ensuing legal proceedings.

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